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Pennsylvania
Bureau of Air Quality

Clean Air Plans

Pennsylvania's State Implementation Plan (SIP)


Please note: Clicking on theplus signsymbol will display further information.

 

Regulatory SIP Revisions

  • new Title V Annual Emission Fee:  A revision to Pennsylvania’s State Implementation Plan set forth at 40 CFR 52.2020 and to the Title V Program Approval codified in 40 CFR Part 70, Appendix A concerning amendments to 25 Pa. Code Chapter 127 has been submitted to the Regional Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region III for approval. The revision implements an increased Title V annual emission fee in § 127.705 of $85 per ton of “regulated pollutant” for up to 4,000 tons of emissions of each regulated pollutant beginning with emissions occurring in calendar year 2013 and payable by Sept. 1, 2014.
    • Transmittal Letter (PDF)
    • Pa. Bulletin – Proposed Rulemaking Notice (PDF)
    • Pa. Bulletin – Final Rulemaking Notice (PDF)
    • Comment/Response Document (PDF)
    • Newspaper Notices (PDF)(3.2 MB)


  • Proposed SIP Revision: Portable Fuel Container Repeal: The comment period is now closed for this proposed SIP revision. Raw data files are available upon request. Since no one expressed an interest in testifying at the public hearing for this SIP by Jan. 9, 2014, the hearing has been cancelled.

Non-Regulatory SIP Revisions

Reducing Regional Haze

  • Revision to Pennsylvania’s State Implementation Plan for Regional Haze The Regional Haze Rule (40 CFR 51.308) requires States to establish goals and strategies for improving visibility in all of the country’s 156 Class I national parks and wilderness areas.
    • Summary (PDF)
    • Transmittal Letter (PDF)
    • Final Regional Haze SIP Revision (PDF 2.5MB)
    • Appendices
      • Appendix A – MANE-VU Interim Report (May 2006) (PDF)
      • Appendix B – Contribution Assessment for MANE-VU (NESCAUM, August 2006) (PDF 3.4MB)
      • Appendix C – VISTAS, Shenandoah Group Contribution Assessment (May 2007) (PDF 1.4MB)
      • Appendix D – WV and VA Emails; Agendas for FLM Conference Calls; FLM MOU (PDF)
      • Appendix E – Baseline and Natural Background Visibility Conditions: Considerations and Proposed Approach to the Calculation of Baseline and Natural Background Visibility Conditions at MANE-VU Class I Areas (December 2006) (PDF)
      • Appendix F – 2002 Baseline Emissions Inventory (MS XL Available from ranbordner@pa.gov)
      • Appendix H – 2018 Projected Emissions Inventory (MS XL Available from ranbordner@pa.gov)
      • Appendix I – MANE-VU CALPUFF Modeling Results for Pennsylvania BART Sources (MS XL Available from ranbordner@pa.gov)
      • Appendix J – Pennsylvania’s BART Analysis Review Memos (PDF)
      • Appendix K – VISTAS Power Point Presentation of 2018 Visibility Improvement Projections, March 2008 (PDF)
      • Appendix L – 2018 Visibility Projections Report (NESCAUM, May 2008) (PDF)
      • Appendix M – MANE-VU ‘Ask’ Statement Within MANE-VU (June 20, 2007)
        MANE-VU ‘Ask’ Statement Outside of MANE-VU (June 20, 2007) (PDF 2MB)
      • Appendix N – CAIR Plus Report (ICF, May 2007) (PDF)
      • Appendix O – Reasonable Progress Report (MACTEC, July 2007) (PDF 8.1MB)
      • Appendix P – Five -Factor Analysis of BART-Eligible Sources (NESCAUM, June 2007) (PDF)
      • Appendix Q – Assessment of Control Technology Options for BART-Eligible Sources (NESCAUM, March 2005) (PDF)
      • Appendix R – Nature of the Fine Particle and Regional Haze Air Quality Problems in the MANE-VU Region (NESCAUM, November 2006) (PDF 2MB)
      • Appendix S – MANE-VU Modeling for Reasonable Progress Goals: Model Performance Evaluation (NESCAUM, February 2008) (PDF 2.6MB)
      • Appendix T – MANE-VU Construction Activities TSD (September 2006) (PDF)
      • Appendix U – MANE-VU Smoke Management TSD (September 2006) (PDF)
      • Appendix V – Development of Emissions Projections for 2009, 2012, and 2018 For Non-EGU Point, Area and Non-road Sources in MANE-VU Region (MACTEC, February 2007) (PDF)
      • Appendix W – Documentation of 2018 Emissions from EGUs (Alpine Geophysics, August 2009) (PDF)
      • Appendix X – MANE-VU FLM Consultation Framework (May 2006) (PDF)
      • Appendix Y – Summary Detail of MANE-VU Ask Statement Development (PDF)
      • Appendix Z – Reserved for Comment and Response Document
      • Appendix AA – FLM Comments/Department Responses (PDF)
      • Appendix BB – Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) Enforcement Order and cover letter, BART review memo for Eastman Chemical Resins (PDF)
      • Appendix CC – VISTAS Comments on MANE-VU Best and Final Modeling (Letter to Anna Garcia dated April 25, 2008) (PDF)
      • Appendix DD – ConocoPhillips Consent Decree, Civil Action H-05-0258 (PDF 8.6MB)
      • Appendix EE – Sunoco Consent Decree, Civil Action 05-CV-02866 (PDF 2.7MB)

Infrastructure SIP Submittals

“Infrastructure” SIPs address the elements required by Section 110(a)(2) of the Clean Air Act for the implementation, maintenance and enforcement of each National Ambient Air Quality Standard.

Reducing Fine Particulate Pollution

Particulate matter (PM) is the general term used for a mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. Fine particles are those that are less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5). Fine particles may be emitted directly by a source or formed in the atmosphere.

The federal government set a National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM2.5 to protect public health in 1997 and revised the standard in 2006. For areas that do not meet the standard, the state must submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) to the EPA that outlines the measures that will be taken to attain the health-based PM2.5 standard. States may also submit maintenance plans to the EPA that detail how the state will assure the standard will continue to be met for the next 10 years.

Reducing Ozone Pollution

Ground-level ozone pollution occurs when hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides bake in the sun. These gases come from unburned fuel and solvents, car exhaust, factory stack emissions and homeowners' and individuals' activities. The federal government set a National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone to protect public health. For areas that do not meet the standard, the state must submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) to the EPA that outlines the measures that will be taken to attain the health-based ozone standard. States may also submit maintenance plans to the EPA that detail how the state will assure the standard will continue to be met for the next 10 years.

Reducing Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide is a byproduct of the incomplete burning of fuels. Industrial processes contribute to carbon monoxide pollution levels, but the principal source of carbon monoxide in most large urban areas is vehicle emissions. Peak carbon monoxide concentrations typically occur during the colder months of the year when automotive emissions are greater and nighttime inversion conditions are more frequent. The EPA has established a National Ambient Air Quality Standard for CO to protect public health.

Reducing Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)

Sulfur dioxide is a gaseous pollutant that is emitted primarily by industrial furnaces or power plants burning coal or oil containing sulfur. The major health effects associated with high exposures to sulfur dioxide include effects on breathing and respiratory illness symptoms. The environmental effects include plant damage, visibility impairment, acid rain and damage to structures. The EPA has established a National Ambient Air Quality Standard for SO2 to protect public health.

Reducing Pollution from Vehicles

Vehicles emit a number of harmful air pollutants that have the potential to adversely affect people's respiratory systems. These chemicals and particles are particularly dangerous for children, the elderly and those with existing respiratory problems such as asthma. As people increasingly depend on their cars and drive more and more miles, it is important that the vehicles' exhaust systems become cleaner. The following plans aim to reduce air pollution resulting from automobiles and other vehicles to help Pennsylvania attain the health-based ozone standard.

Allegheny County Health Department

The Allegheny County Health Department maintains information on SIP revisions it has developed. See their page at: Air Quality Regulations

  • The Allegheny County Board of Health is seeking comments on several changes to its regulations, some of which will then be submitted to EPA as a revision to the State Implementation Plan. The county will accept comments through Jan. 9, 2013. Information on the public comment period is available under “Hot Topics”. The proposed SIP revision is available under “Currently Proposed SIP Revisions".

  • Final SIP Revision to incorporate New Source Review regulations. Submitted to the EPA June 25, 2012.
    • Transmittal Letter (PDF)
    • Final SIP Revision (PDF 2.3MB)
  • Final SIP Revision to incorporate consumer products regulations. Submitted to the EPA June 25, 2012.
    • Transmittal Letter (PDF)
    • Final SIP Revision (PDF 1.4MB)
  • Final SIP Revision to incorporate regulations controlling NOX from glass melting furnaces.  Submitted to the EPA June 25, 2012.
    • Transmittal Letter (PDF)
    • Final SIP Revision (PDF 1.4MB)

Philadelphia County Air Management Services

The Philadelphia County Dept. of Health, Air Management Services Division maintains information on SIP revisions it is developing at this page, under "Public Meetings & Notices". Below are prior submittals they have provided us.